Partnership Map

Partnership Map 0_02

I’ve developed a Partnership Map, designed to help us think about which companies we partner with and why.

With my clients, I’ve often found workshop attendees confused (at least initially) by the term partnership. If you use other well-known tools such as the Business Model Canvas, maybe you’ve encountered similar issues.

We all use the term partnership, but rarely question what we actually mean by it. I usually revert to asking what the partnership entails. If it’s one company paying another for services, is that really partnership?

Components

There are two parts to the target

  1. The Map itself: designed so you can print it large and place your partnering companies on the map
  2. A table of the definition of the tiers. I’ll admit this is a very rough draft, but I thought it better to get it out in the world and improve with collaboration, rather than it just being the product of one person.

How to use it

  1. Work through each of your partnerships and place them according to their sector and tier.
  2. Once all partnerships are on the map, step back to look at them
  3. Evaluate whether that partnership should exist, moved tiers or become a supplier-client relationship. Think of partnerships moving from outside to inside or vice versa, or partnerships being consolidated across sectors.
  4. If a particular partnership is giving cause for concern, then consider using the Partnership Canvas for more in-depth analysis.

Status

This is a first draft; it’s my first attempt at putting down my thoughts into a picture.

There are a few tasks before I’d consider it a first release:

  • The alignment of the words to the circle isn’t spot-on. I’ll wait to see if the quadrants and sectors change first, before making it neater.
  • The definitions of the tiers and the actions need more thought
  • Validate the quadrants – I’m not comfortable with the name Business Capability; it’s a working title
  • Validate the sectors – Do these need to change, add sectors, merge sectors?

 

 

I’m happy to collaborate on it, so get in touch at @alanward and let’s talk.

The Content

Partnership Map 0_02
Partnership Map 0_02

 

Partnership Map Definition 0_02
Partnership Map Definition 0_02

How the Lean Canvas Promotes the Sharing of Innovation Ideas

Lean Canvas

I had the great opportunity to see how different organisations approach short-scale corporate innovation, at the NWG Festival of Innovation (#NWGInnovationFestival) earlier this month.

The Festival was set-up to resemble a summer festival, complete with the action happening in temporary tents around the racecourse. There were several different design sprints each in their own tent section, each tackling a different theme.

The Challenge

Walking through the different sprint rooms, it took time to understand what problem was being solved, how the team were approaching the solution and what was being designed. This took longer for some of the sprints than for others.

Lean Canvas
Lean Canvas

In one particular group, understanding what the teams were doing was an amazingly easy and quick task. Stepping back, I noticed that each of the teams in that sprint room were using the same tool and they were using it the same way (which is a good sign of consistent multi-group facilitation).

The Lean Canvas

The tool they were using is a simple one, based on the Business Model Canvas. Ash Maurya created the Lean Canvas which has some of the same elements but some different elements for use when creating new propositions, by focussing on the customer and their problem.

Having used the canvas in action before, it was an eye-opener to see how easy it was to understand from the outside, i.e. from someone that hadn’t been part of that sprint. That’s part of the value of any of the canvases and one of the primary reasons I use them with my clients. However, it was a pleasant experience to realise how easy it was to understand when I was on the other side of the fence.

Conclusion

No matter what changes you’re promoting within your organisation or sharing with others, consider the most appropriate tool for the job. The value of the tool you choose is not just how it promotes the progress of your team’s work but also how it promotes the sharing of that progress and the associated concepts.

Enterprise Architecture in Startups: Is it relevant?

Ludo Board for depicting strategy
Ludo Board

Practitioners of Customer Development, Lean Startup and Enterprise Architecture can all learn from each other. But they shouldn’t enforce their views on each other as there are some incompatibilities. Let’s see how enterprise architecture in startups can exist.

Background

The Startup culture and methods have largely been defined by Steve Blank who wrote The Startup Owners Handbook and later, by Eric Ries who wrote Lean Startup. Both of these consider how newly-created companies can grow quickly and in the right direction for their founders and customers. Many authors and speakers followed, but for this article, we’ll mainly focus on these two.

Enterprise Architecture (EA) functions can be found in many large, mature organisations that have a need to get a grip on their ICT* landscape. Continue reading “Enterprise Architecture in Startups: Is it relevant?”