Partnership Map 0_02

Partnership Map

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Articles, Facilitation, Methodology, Service Redesign, Startups, Strategy

I’ve developed a Partnership Map, designed to help us think about which companies we partner with and why. With my clients, I’ve often found workshop attendees confused (at least initially) by the term partnership. If you use other well-known tools such as the Business Model Canvas, maybe you’ve encountered similar issues. We all use the term partnership, but rarely question what we actually mean by it. I usually revert to asking what the partnership entails. If it’s one company paying another for services, is that really partnership? Components There are two parts to the target The Map itself: designed so you can print it large and place your partnering companies on the map A table of the definition of the tiers. I’ll admit this is a very rough draft, but I thought it better to get it out in the […]

Corporate Archimate

Using Archimate for Business Motivation Model and MSP – Part 3: Corporate

Posted on 3 CommentsPosted in Articles, Methodology, Strategy

In the first article, I introduced the standards and the tools that are in scope of this series of articles. To recap, the chosen tools/standards/methods are: Archimate – The open source enterprise architecture modelling standard Archi – a tool for working with Archimate Managing Successful Programmes (MSP) Business Motivation Model (BMM) In the second article, I introduced how I’m handling benefits and goals In this article, I’m going to introduce the corporate element of the BMM. What we’ll cover Corporate vision as opposed to MSP vision Drivers and influencers What we won’t cover Programme plans Risk governance, etc IT artefacts Anything that isn’t related to business motivation. Archimate and Archi are capable of modelling more than just business motivation, but my scope is purely the intersection of Business Motivation, Archimate and MSP. Background In the previous article, I mentioned that […]

Using Archimate for Business Motivation Model and MSP – Part 1

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I spend a lot of time around programmes that are managed with Managing Successful Programmes. I’m either in a separate architecture function, advising on changes, or sometimes in the trenches of the programmes themselves. There’s often a disconnect between the tools and the techniques being used, especially when different team members are coming from different backgrounds with different experiences. Business Motivation I’m always concerned about the why. Why does a programme exist? Why is it doing what it’s doing in the way that it’s doing it? Often that boils down to asking what problems are we trying to solve, but sometimes it’s more complex than that. I’ve been a fan of the Business Motivation Model (BMM) for a few years and have used it successfully with clients, especially to highlight the gaps between expected benefits and portfolio/programme activities. So I’ve […]

Business Motivation - Goals - alancward.co.uk

Using Archimate for Business Motivation Model and MSP – Part 2: Goals and Benefits

Posted on 3 CommentsPosted in Articles, Methodology, Strategy

The concept of merging standards and tools isn’t new, in fact my first professional role was to map the supplier’s tool (Oracle Designer) and method to the corporate methodology (Fujitsu Macroscope). So I’m approaching this, not with any apprehension of difficulty, but instead from a perspective of being concerned about the level of compromise necessary to integrate the tools, standards and methods. I set out in the previous article why I was doing this. I’d come across several articles mapping out the Business Motivation Model and Archimate, with varying degrees of success. The main issue is the granularity of goals and how that doesn’t really help with the difference between board-level goals and local, more project level goals. In a way, that may be an advantage. The best was this article at bizzdesign.com The other issue I’m finding is that it’s […]

Books

Where Do I Learn? – Part 2 – Books

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Articles, Mentoring and Training, Methodology, Service Redesign, Startups, Strategy

If I’m driving, I’m listening to podcasts. If I’m travelling by train, then I’m reading. I typically read books that don’t directly relate to my profession, but those that I hope will change my approach to how I work with clients. For every client I go to, I end up mentoring business analysts, business architects, programme manager, project managers and other change programme staff. So I’ve kept a list of references (not just books) on Evernote and I tailor it to the person I’m mentoring at that time. Here’s the list of books that I recommend: 1. Lean 1.1. Womack and Jones: Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation http://amzn.to/1sCHWwD This is the book I recommend to anyone trying to understand lean for changing services and organisations. However, once you understand, you’ll start applying it to other areas […]

textile

Enterprise Architecture as a household chore

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If transformative change is the task of ironing, then Enterprise Architecture is the act of stretching the fabric across the ironing board beforehand. Ensuring that the creases that already existed are smoothed out, allowing the change to flow freely, instead of exacerbating the folds that were already present before the change. Experienced Enterprise Architects will know just how much stretching is required, how hot to make the change and, most importantly, when it’s done and it’s time to move onto the next item.

ticket

Charging Admission as an Example of Changing Strategy

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We should all look at the thinking behind this article in Business Of Fashion; there’s a lot we can take away from it. It shows a level of innovation and shines light on so many values that we take for granted.   The Premise The author writes about the shift of a fashion store to charging customers a fee to enter the store. The argument is that the store is an entertainment experience and that we expect to pay for other places of entertainment, e.g. theatres, cinemas, etc, so shouldn’t we also expect to pay to go to fashion stores? So instead, we could charge admission not for the store but for the experience which happens to be in a store. There’s a distinction there in that most stores will not have an experience worth charging. Indeed, as the author mentions […]

The Kano model can operate in reverse: exploring the travel industry

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You may have come across the Kano model before. It’s an analytical technique for understanding what your customers want and, importantly, what they’ve come to expect as required. Exploration I was travelling on a local train last week with a largely empty carriage. I had the choice of seats. I am familiar enough with these carriages to know that there are heating vents in blocks underneath every third row of seats, so I didn’t sit behind one of them. That way my feet would have somewhere to fit. So I a seat two rows behind. Then I noticed that my knees didn’t fit. Actually, couldn’t fit. I was seated as far back in the seat as I could go and still my legs could not fit straight in front of me. I had to resort to man-spreading (the shame of […]

Sheep

Black sheep or Shepherd?

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As a business architect, I feel like I’m sometimes the black sheep and sometimes the shepherd of the Enterprise Architecture function.   The Black Sheep 1: Uncovering the rationale I feel like the black sheep because I find myself regularly asking why. Why did you make that decision? Why did you choose that approach? Why caused you to think that way? I tend to use different, phrasing which is more approachable and open, such as “tell me the story so far. How did we get to where we are now?”, etc. But underneath it all, I’m aiming to understand the motivation behind the changes that are progressing in front of me. It’s not so much a position of devil’s advocate, more of one of uncovering the rationale behind decisions and evaluating whether that decision is still a valid one. Many […]

Zombie Hands

Be a Startup, not a Zombie

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I’m just catching up on an episode of The Salesman Podcast hosted by Will Barron. The episode is about being the first sales person in a new company. While I agree with everything Vinnie has said, one thing came to mind. If you’re the first salesperson and you’re conducting product-market fit conversations, then you’re working for a zombie, not a startup; it’s dead, but doesn’t know it. I can’t think of a more suitable activity for the founders before hiring anyone than to conduct those conversations themselves. The only exception I can think of is where the founders have zero business sense (think of the traditional, out-dated view of scientists) and need to hire to make a business. Think back to Steve Blank’s Customer Development concepts and subsequently, Eric Ries’ Lean Startup, checking whether the market wants your concept and whether […]